Sample Lesson

Plans

 

 

I.  Rachel Mingle                               November 27, 2007                            4th Grade

 

II. Musical Concept

The quality of a sound is affected by the material, shape, and size of the source. 

 

III. Observable Learning Outcomes

            Students will be able to identify timbres of different keyboard instruments.

 

IV. Students’ Prior Knowledge

Students should have knowledge of what makes an instrument a keyboard instrument.  Students should be able to discriminate between different instrument sounds.

 

V. National and State Standard(s) Addressed in the Lesson

            9.2, 9.3, 9.4

 

VI. Materials, Board and Space Preparation Needed for Lesson:

Recorded music for needed selections, listening map transparency for Close Encounters of the Third Kind, visuals of different keyboard instruments to be discussed, board space

 

VII. Teaching Process

1.      Can anyone name a type of keyboard instruments that we have here? (piano, xylophone, etc.)

2.      Introduce some others and discuss how they might be different.

3.      Harpsichord: When the key is pressed, a string will pluck a quill.  A quill was originally a feather, but now is made of leather or plastic.

4.      Listen to Gigue from French Suite No. 5 by Johann Sebastian Bach (CD 8-Track 22)

5.      What words would you use to describe the timbre/sound of the instrument you just heard?

6.      Pipe Organ: Pipes are made of wood or metal.

7.      Listen to Toccata in D Minor  by Johann Sebastian Bach (CD8-Track 23)

8.      Have the students improvise movements during the start of the toccata.

9.      What instrument is playing? (organ)

10.  Play the piece again and have them think about the organ as well as the harpsichord from the previous piece.

11.  How are the harpsichord and organ the same?

12.  How are the harpsichord and organ different?

13.  Pianoforte: The first pianos were called pianoforte because the performer could make both soft and loud sounds by touching the keys in different ways.  When the player presses a piano key, a hammer inside the instrument strikes one or more strings.  Striking harder makes a louder sound.

14.  Listen to Waltz in D Flat (“Minute” Waltz) by Frederic Chopin (CD8-Track24)

15.  Why do you think it is called the “Minute” Waltz? (Because it is so fast, it can be played in about a minute.)

16.  Then listen to Prelude in A major  by Frederic Chopin as performed by Vladimir Ashkenazy (CD8-Track 25)

17.  What instrument played the music we just heard?

18.  Synthesizer: It looks like a keyboard, but it can mimic the sounds of all types of instruments.

19.  Listen to the synthesizer version of Close Encounters of the Third Kind. (CD8-Track 26)

20.  Follow the listening map on the transparency while listening to Close Encounters of the Third Kind.

21.  Test the students’ comprehension by having them identify what instrument they are hearing as you play excerpts from all of the previous examples. (This would be a could opportunity for an elimination game.)

 

VIII. Assessment of students

Students will have a better understanding of some different members of the keyboard family.  They will be able to identify the different members by listening to samples of each.

---

I.  Rachel Mingle                               November 27, 2007                            4th Grade

 

II. Musical Concept

Music may become faster or slower by changing the speed of the underlying pulse.

III. Observable Learning Outcomes

Students will understand the concept of tempo Students will then be able to differentiate between different tempos.

IV. Students’ Prior Knowledge

            Students must understand the concepts of beat and pulse.

V. National and State Standard(s) Addressed in the Lesson

            9.1, 9.3, 9.4

VI. Materials, Board and Space Preparation Needed for Lesson:

Board space, compact disc with needed tracks, stereo, visual aids for both the board and individual students

VII. Teaching Process

1.      Begin by reviewing terms discussed during previous lesson.

a.      Adagio-slow

b.      Moderato-moderate

c.       Andante-walking speed

d.      Allegro-fast

e.      Presto-very fast

2.      Everyone please wave very slowly as though waving goodbye.

3.      Then have them wave as they normally would.

4.      Finally, ask them to wave very quickly.

5.      What did you change in your wave? (the speed)

6.      The speed of the beat is called tempo.

7.      When someone says to you, “Walk! Don’t run!” what do you do?  You change the speed of your movement.  In music, tempo can help communicate the feeling of a song.

8.      Look at the words for Oh, Danny Boy, and let’s decide what tempo would be best.

9.      Today we are going to learn only the first verse of Oh, Danny Boy.

10.  Listen as I sing through the song once and tell me if the tempo we have selected was the right choice.

11.  Teacher sings first verse through.

12.  Discuss whether or not the tempo marking was accurate.

13.  Listen, this time, to see if any of the melody lines sound the same.

14.  Teacher sings song again.

15.  Now that you can identify that first line, raise your hand each time you hear it.

16.  Teacher sings song 3rd time and helps students know when to raise hand.

17.  Teacher: Repeat after me, “Oh, Danny Boy, the pipes, the pipes are calling,”

18.  Students: Oh, Danny Boy, the pipes, the pipes are calling,

19.  Teacher: From glen to glen, and down the mountain side;

20.  Students: From glen to glen, and down the mountain side;

21.  Teacher: Let’s try just that much.  All sing, “Oh, Danny Boy, the pipes, the pipes are calling, From glen to glen, and down the mountain side;

22.  Teacher: Now repeat, “The summer’s gone, and all the roses falling,

23.  Students: The summer’s gone, and all the roses falling,

24.  Teacher: ‘Tis you, ‘tis you must go, and I must bide.

25.  Students: ‘Tis you, ‘tis you must go, and I must bide.

26.  Teacher: Let’s do it from the beginning.  Everyone sing; “Oh, Danny Boy, the pipes, the pipes are calling, From glen to glen, and down the mountain side; The summer’s gone, and all the roses falling, ‘tis you, ‘tis you must go, and I must bide.

27.  Have them sing along with the recording (CD2-Track 19)

28.  In Oh, Danny Boy, the tempo stays the same.  Let’s see how tempos can change within a song.

29.  Give students copies of enclosed visuals and have them point to the appropriate tempo as they listen to The Chicken Dance.

30.  Play the Chicken Dance. (CD2-Track 21)

31.  Teach students the movements for the chicken dance.

a.       Chirp with your hands

b.      Flap your wings

c.       Waddle downward

d.      Clap four times

32.  Have students do motions along with the recording of The Chicken Dance.

33.  Ask, “Do your movements match the tempo of the music?” (yes)

34.  How did the tempo change in The Chicken Dance? (slow to fast, or adagio to presto)

35.  To finish, have half of the class do the motions while the rest of the class indicates the correct tempo on their sheets.  Switch the groups and have them each try.

36.  Time permitting, listen to Hungarian Dance No. 6 and have them identify the correct tempo changes for this piece by Johannes Brahms. (CD2-Track 20)

 

VIII. Assessment of students

Students will be able to grasp the concept of tempo, and gain a better understanding of the different levels of tempo.  At the very least, they will be able to clearly identify and define adagio and presto.